1. cosettefauchelevents:

    what if they took west side story and made a version where it was set in verona in the 1400s and instead of gangs there are two powerful italian families. i just think that would be really cool

    (Source: jonflanagans, via greenbuster)

     


  2. wendy-birds-and-total-nerds:

    buckbarrow:

    the theatre fandom is a little overly dramatic 

    "I don’t know what you mean," I sing passionately as I ride the chandelier to the ground, waving an enormous red flag.

    (via nevermore191)

     


  3. novakian:

    rhett-the-jet:

    The next time there’s an awkward silence, try whispering, “Did you forget your line?”

    (via shorty-cake)

     

  4. amateurextraordinaire:

    girlwithalessonplan:

    awkwardblackstagehand:

    techweek:

    Do you own this book, techies? You should, it’s amazing. It has literally everything you will ever need to know about theatre tech. Get it! Read it! Love it!

    Yep!!

    When I took over the tech theater class, my husband got me this.  

    Fucking love this thing

     


  5. I wrote my first play, Uncommon Women and Others, in the hopes of seeing an all-female curtain call in the basement of the Yale School of Drama. A man in the audience stood up during a post show discussion and announced, “I can’t get into this, it’s all about girls.” I thought to myself, “Well, I’ve been getting in to Hamlet and Laurence of Arabia my whole life, so you better start trying.”
    — Wendy Wasserstein (via disneyprincesspotter)

    (Source: realliveprincess, via huggablekaiju)

     

  6. the-leader-in-red:

    So, someone was searching for the whole scene of the Death of Mercutio in which the Romercutio kiss happens. This is it. Enjoy

    burning feels

     

  7. kryptaria:

    Tor.com found this picture of a young, ripped Patrick Stewart as Oberon in a 1977 production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

    Click the link to see a gorgeous young Sir Ian McKellen, too.

    (via or-even-cured)

     

  8. deducecanoe:

    ghost-jehan:

    The (in)famous Romercutio kiss from the italian version of the musical

    Wow. I will sail that ship. 

    (Source: drunkpylades, via welshyak)

     


  9. snafflebithumptywink:

    snafflebithumptywink:

    xdominoe:

    snafflebithumptywink:

    omfg tony nominations

    today

    tONY NOMINATIONS TO DAY

    shhhHHHHH

    I WILL NOT

    THIS IS MY SUPERBOWL

    TONDFHJSNOMTRDITNGTIONSTODAYHJ

     


  10. snafflebithumptywink:

    xdominoe:

    snafflebithumptywink:

    omfg tony nominations

    today

    tONY NOMINATIONS TO DAY

    shhhHHHHH

    I WILL NOT

    THIS IS MY SUPERBOWL

    (via atouchofsass)

     


  11. snafflebithumptywink:

    xdominoe:

    snafflebithumptywink:

    omfg tony nominations

    today

    tONY NOMINATIONS TO DAY

    shhhHHHHH

    I WILL NOT

    THIS IS MY SUPERBOWL

     


  12. Among drama students, “Milking the Giant Cow" is a term that refers to the practice of holding your hands skyward (or merely gesticulating wildly) to show emotion. May be accompanied by a Skyward Scream.

    If they fall to their knees while doing so, they are contractually obligated to raise their hands to the heavens, grasp the invisible teats tightly, and pull down a few times, as if milking an oversized bovine.

     

  13. paperchessmen:

    Colin Morgan in rehearsal for The Tempest (x)

    Well, someone’s getting typecast.

     


  14. Let an astrophysicist teach you a little something about learning Shakespeare. Yes, Neil deGrasse Tyson has helped me on my journey toward good memorization. 

     

  15. David Tennant talks about playing Richard II.


    Richard is King. A monarch ordained by God to lead his people. But he is also a man of very human weakness. A man whose vanity threatens to divide the great houses of England and drag his people into a dynastic civil war that will last 100 years. RSC Artistic Director Gregory Doran directs David Tennant in the title role.

    Richard II is the first production in a new cycle of Shakespeare’s History plays, directed by Gregory, that will be performed over the coming seasons.

    David is joined in the company by Oliver Ford Davies, who also appeared with him in the acclaimed 2008 Hamlet.